Monday, November 2, 2015

Men's Windbreaker Jacket


Hi, I've survived a week's dosage of butter and sugar. After C's birthday on Wednesday, she was the baker lady at school on Friday, which only meant more baking. The idea of baker man/lady is to involve kids in the baking process, but this time C was way too busy with some Lego she got for her birthday. It turned out to be a good thing, because she didn't accidently swallow half of the chocolate chips that were supposed to go into the biscuits this time.


Two nights last week I fell asleep at 8 p.m. and woke up at midnight coming to the dinning room table to cut some fabric. I am considering sewing and blogging my work and I'm taking it quite seriously. Maybe too seriously. Most C's friends' moms are stay-at-home moms, and the ones that do have some kind of day job/ part-time job are mostly rediscovery new careers after having kids. Often the hours are rather flexible, to accommodate the kids' schedule. I haven't brought any bread to the table for 6 years and I know everytime we have a financial argument, the arrows are always pointing at me. I could go and get a day job, but then we would have to hire people to take C out of school and look after her from the early afternoons and definitely a baby-sitter during the school holidays. Besides the fact that a big chunk of my salary might go straight to the baby-sitter and dinner take-aways, my passion is not sitting in an office and counting the hours any more. Yes, sometimes I do picture myself in an office, dealing with orders and numbers and more logical grown-ups. When it gets hard keeping C entertained, I feel the need to go out there and spend a month vacation working in an office. But I'm glad I stayed at home and now I've discovered this passion that has woken up the creativity inside me and I feel I should stick with it and see where it takes me. I know posting these garments I've sewn won't help with any financial situations, but I'm investing the time in me. My goal for next year is to cover at least C's extra mural fees (sounds realistic?), even if it means I have to have a little production line in the house to sell some of the garments.


A few months ago, I ordered this book called Men's Basic Styles. But the pattern sheets didn't arrive with the book. I emailed them immediately and the lovely people at CDJapan had the sheets sent to me within a week. Amazon often don't ship to South Africa. I'm very glad I found this alternative Japanese website. Although these books are all in Japanese language, the website itself is in English.
 
It wasn't my initial attemp to clothes my whole family, but I've been interested in men's wear for a while. I know they usually involve a lot more pattern pieces than women's wear, with a lot more details that are easily unnoticed by a non-sewer. Like this jacket, for example, almost there's a top stitch on the right side of every single seam. This waterproofing material is quite difficult to press, so I love the top stitching part to hold the seams neat. Bias tapes are applied on the hood and neckline seams. They definitely make a garment look more finished and professional. The pockets themselves have some interesting details too.


I did spent some extra time putting this jacket together and admiring it. It was really fun. Overall, it's a really cool jacket, except....
 
It's teeny weeny small on M, even though I've measured and chosen the biggest size already. To make it again, I'll have to grade one or two sizes up myself, for the arms and chest area. Certain movements are restrained like stretching your arms to drive, or tying shoe laces. I know that kind of feeling. It would make me  very irritated. But M insists on hanging the jacket in the wardrobe. I don't know when he'll actually wear it due to the size issue, but I appreciate for him to accept it.
 
 A closer look of the jacket.
 
I say he is a natural in front of the camera. C strongly suggests my sewing rotation include daddy now as well. I'm not so sure about that just yet. But it definitely opens a new door to me. Sewing for men isn't that scary after all.

No comments:

Post a Comment